Health Plans for Over 2 Million Californians Don’t Follow Consumer Protection Law

Every morning, Tracey Watts checked her body for blood. The recent PhD has a rare condition that causes her to have leaky blood vessels. She bled out of pinprick-size spots on her lower body and legs for eight months as she searched for a specialist who accepted her insurance. Watts is one of millions of Californians enrolled in health plans exempted from a law that requires insurers to provide patients with timely access to doctors.

Proposed Ban on Flavored Tobacco in San Francisco Expected on Ballot Next Summer

A new regulation that had been signed into law called for a ban, effective April 2018, on sales of flavored tobacco including menthol cigarettes, flavored liquid for e-cigarettes and flavored chewing tobacco. While a tobacco giant-backed group gathered enough signatures to require the ban be voted on during an upcoming election, they aren’t the only ones opposed to the ban. Lobbying is expected to be equally fierce among people opposed to the ban which includes owners of more than 900 corner stores in San Francisco.

What Happens When ICE Detains Parents, From a Pediatrician’s Perspective

When I first met Daniel, he was 2 months old. His aunt, Sandra, brought him to the clinic in South Los Angeles where I work as a pediatrician because he had persistent coughing. While I was examining his lungs, he coughed so hard that he vomited in my hair. I was worried that he might have whooping cough and I started asking more about his history. First question: Why was he with his aunt and not his parents?

To Help Latinos Age Well, We Need to Address Inequities

Norma has been working since she was a teenager. She started working as a farmworker, then became a cannery worker and now works in childcare. Now at 60 years old, she is unsure if she “will ever be able to retire.” Her story is illustrative of the challenges that Latino seniors face trying to afford retirement, health care, food and housing.

What Data From California’s New Assisted Dying Law Tells Us

In the first six months of California’s new End of Life Option Act, which allows some terminally ill patients to end their lives with medication, there have been no initial surprises. California statistics are so far quite similar to those reported by Oregon and Washington, which also have aid-in-dying laws. However, many people seeking to use the End of Life Act are having trouble doing so.

Despite New Law, Doctor Directories Are Still Often Inaccurate

When Jackie called her assigned primary-care physician for the first time, she was told that her doctor was a specialist, not a primary care physician. She would need to see someone else, they informed her. Jackie then called her insurance company, and asked for help finding another doctor. Armed with a list from the insurance company, Jackie tried again, calling a doctor in the insurer’s directory. But, she recounted, “the receptionist said, ‘He’s not taking anybody and we’ve been trying to get off the list for three years.’”

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