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It Takes a Village: Toody Maher Works With Richmond Families to Transform City Parks

January 22, 2016
It Takes a Village: Toody Maher Works With Richmond Families to Transform City Parks

After a dramatic transformation, Pogo Park in Richmond is once again a place for kids to play. Photo courtesy of Pogo Park.

By Linda Childers

When Toody Maher first moved to Richmond, she was dismayed to see how many of the city’s parks were in shambles. Local residents described the parks as being “dirty, dull and dangerous,” and one in particular caught Maher’s eye – Elm Playlot, a half-acre park set in the middle of the Iron Triangle, one of Richmond’s toughest neighborhoods.

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Music to their ears

January 21, 2016

 


People with dementia, if isolated, can withdraw into their own world. But when engaged with others, their condition, or at least their wellbeing, can improve.  A Fairfield music therapist who works with people with dementia has seen physical, emotions and cognitive improvements in her clients. Veronica Moscoso shares their story in this short video report.

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Brown’s transportation budget celebrates the car

January 19, 2016

By Daniel Weintraub

Weeks after returning from the Paris summit on climate change where he was hailed as a leader in the movement to limit greenhouse gases, Gov. Jerry Brown has proposed a new transportation budget that celebrates the car.

In 2016-17, Brown wants to spend $16 billion on transportation, and most of that would go toward making it easier for people to drive.

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TeleVisit: Bringing Community Home

January 19, 2016
TeleVisit: Bringing Community Home

by Matt Perry

 

What if you had the perfect technology solution for isolated seniors… and nobody wanted it?

Welcome to TeleVisit.

Over a decade ago, Wesley Cheng’s garage was converted into a bedroom for his aging mother with Alzheimer’s disease. “She drove us crazy,” says Cheng. “And it wasn’t her fault.” The elderly woman threatened to kill herself if she was ever placed into a long-term care facility.

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Universities Lack Guidelines for Responding to Domestic Violence

January 18, 2016
Universities Lack Guidelines for Responding to Domestic Violence By Lily Dayton Studies have found that the prevalence of domestic violence and dating violence among college students is on par with the number of female college students who’ve experienced sexual assault. “About 21 percent of college students report they are experiencing violence from a current partner,” says Jessica Merrill, communications manager for California Partnership to End Domestic Violence.  

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Amidst New Regulations, California Universities Grapple with Response to Sexual Violence

January 18, 2016
Amidst New Regulations, California Universities Grapple with Response to Sexual Violence By Lily Dayton In 2014, a storm of protests erupted at Stanford University after student Leah Francis sent an email with a message that went viral: “Stanford did not expel the man who raped me.” Though the majority of a campus judicial panel had found the man responsible for committing sexual assault, they determined he would be allowed to return to campus to finish his coursework and graduate with his class after completing 40 hours of community service, a sexual assault awareness program and a five-quarter suspension, starting in summer quarter—which, Francis stated in her email, amounted to no more than a “gap year.”

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Aging Reform: Super Sized to Bite Sized

January 14, 2016

by Matt Perry

Sometimes, super sizing your meal is just too much.

The same could be said for a state senator’s bill on aging reform, which was deemed “too far reaching” in its lengthy list of recommendations when it was first introduced – and defeated– last year by the Senate Health Committee.

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Alzheimer’s Funding Increases

January 13, 2016

By Matt Perry

Getting sick is expensive. And so is dying… especially from Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

A recent study revealed that of the three leading killers in America – dementia, cancer and heart disease – dementia was by far the most expensive to treat before a patient’s eventual death.

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Smartphones Double-Edged Swords for Victims of Domestic Abuse

January 12, 2016
Smartphones Double-Edged Swords for Victims of Domestic Abuse By Lily Dayton A cellphone is a lifeline for survivors who need to dial 911, find a safe place to stay or reach out for support. But they also make victims vulnerable to their abuser.

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For Kids in Mental Health Crisis, Solutions Loom

January 12, 2016
For Kids in Mental Health Crisis,  Solutions Loom

By Lynn Graebner

California is sending far too many kids with mental health issues to hospital emergency rooms, driving up costs, adding to their trauma and contributing to high rates of youth suicide, experts say.

Despite available resources and models from other states for creating a system to treat children in their homes or the community, most California counties are ill-equipped to handle kids in crisis.

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