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Directories of Doctors Who Treat the Poor Are Inaccurate, Hurting Access

June 29, 2014
Directories of Doctors Who Treat the Poor Are Inaccurate, Hurting Access By Hannah Guzik Directories of doctors given to low-income patients across California are highly inaccurate, making it difficult for them to get the health care they’re entitled to under state law, the California Health Report has found.

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AAP: Before Every Playdate Find out if there is an Unlocked and Loaded Gun in the Home

June 27, 2014

By Fran Kritz

The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence have  launched the ASK (Asking Saves Kids) campaign to  encourage parents to ask if there is a locked, loaded gun in the home before a child goes out for a playdate. According to the AAP, one out of three homes with children in the U.S.

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Creating Friendships between African-American and Caucasian Couples Can Reduce Prejudice

June 26, 2014

By Fran Kritz

Recent research by social scientists at Wayne State University show that the physical presence of romantic partners in intergroup friendships – friendships with different racial and ethnic groups, religious groups, or sexual orientations – positively influences interactions with people who are perceived to be different from themselves.

The study found that couples who interacted with couples of another race showed a greater positive attitude toward the other group than to same-race couple interactions.

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American Academy of Pediatrics Initiates National Efforts on Toxic Stress and Its Impact on Children and Families

June 26, 2014

By Fran Kritz

The American Academy of Pediatrics held a day long symposium on Child Health, Resilience & Toxic Stress in Washington, DC last week.  According to the AAP, science shows that adversity experienced in childhood has long-lasting physical and emotional effects. James Perrin, M.D., president of the AAP, says “this toxic stress will only continue to grow if the nation’s leaders do not intervene now to reduce children’s exposure and the cascade of chronic health problems it causes.”

Participants in the sessions included federal government officials, national thought leaders and health professionals.

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Drug Labels Aren’t Always Translated, Leading to Dangerous Errors

June 25, 2014
Drug Labels Aren’t Always Translated, Leading to Dangerous Errors By Claudia Boyd-Barrett Carolina Paniagua knows what it’s like to live in a world that doesn’t make sense. When the 42-year-old arrived in the United States from Mexico 17 years ago, like many recent immigrants she spoke no English and struggled to understand even the most basic signs and conversations.

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Bill Requires Non-Profit Hospitals to Disclose Spending on Charity Care

June 25, 2014
Bill Requires Non-Profit Hospitals to Disclose Spending on Charity Care By Robin Urevich California’s more than 200 non-profit hospitals claim billions of dollars in federal and state tax exemptions annually. In exchange for that tax relief, they’re required to offer free and discounted health care for the poor and benefits like free vaccinations or disease prevention programs for their communities.

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When the Spirit Moves You… in Later Life

June 22, 2014
When the Spirit Moves You… in Later Life

By Matt Perry

Sex scandals in the Catholic Church. Nativity scenes nixed during Christmas holidays. God kicked out of schools.

In American culture, God is taking one hell of a beating.

At the same time, the nation’s hunger for divine connection – especially among older adults – has never been higher.

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California Improves its Long-Term Supports – Improvements Still Needed

June 18, 2014

By Matt Perry

California’s support systems for older adults, the disabled, and their family caregivers have improved in recent years and now rank among the top ten states in the nation, according to a scorecard released Thursday.

Yet while the state came in ninth overall – with substantial improvements in many areas – its high ranking is due largely to one area in which it excels: a vast choice in long-term care settings and providers.

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Charter Schools May Affect Quality of Education for Disabled Students

June 18, 2014
Charter Schools May Affect Quality of Education for Disabled Students

Photo: File/Getty Images

By Robin Urevich

Charter schools — public schools run by parents, teachers and others largely free of state and local regulations — were designed to provide competition for traditional public schools, forcing them to improve, or lose students.

But the schools’ detractors argue that charters sometimes look better on paper than they are in reality.

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Innovation Programs Aim to Improve Care for Seniors and the Poor, But Are the Results Reliable?

June 17, 2014
Innovation Programs Aim to Improve Care for Seniors and the Poor, But Are the Results Reliable? By Genevieve Bookwalter Donald Vidal has had both of his knees replaced, but the 85-year-old Novato resident experienced different levels of care with each procedure. Although the same surgeon performed both operations, during the second one Vidal was part of a federal pilot program that aims to improve care and save money.

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