Author: Claudia Boyd-Barrett

How to Keep Your Family’s Medi-Cal Benefits

During the pandemic, California and other states didn’t require people to renew their membership Medicaid, known as Medi-Cal in California.

That changed on April 1, when California began sending out renewal packets once again. Renewals will be sent out in batches, based on the month in which beneficiaries originally applied for Medi-Cal.

‘I Had Already Walked That Road.’ How One Woman Is Helping Survivors of Violence 

Maury Danielle studied the flyer about a missing woman that a friend had shared on Facebook. Something about it was wrong, she thought.

The woman’s husband had created the flyer and was calling for help finding his wife. But he gave no context about why his wife had disappeared.

Danielle remembered the times she, too, had gone “missing” from her now-ex-husband. She’d been trying to escape.

Community Workers Fan Out to Persuade Immigrant Seniors to Get Covered

As of October, the most recent month for which data is available, more than 300,000 older immigrant adults who lack legal residency had enrolled in full Medi-Cal benefits, 30 percent more than the state’s original projection.

State health officials, who had based their estimate on the number of people enrolled in a limited form of Medi-Cal that covers only emergency medical services, don’t know how many additional older Californians are eligible.

Financial Abuse Is Common. Now There Are Protections For Survivors

A new law will compel creditors to recognize coerced debt if a survivor can provide proof such as a police report, a court order specifying financial abuse, identity theft report or letter from a professional such as a domestic violence advocate. Creditors can also seek repayment of the debt from the person responsible for it.

Research suggests financial abuse occurs in 99 percent of domestic violence cases. More than half of domestic violence survivors experience coerced or fraudulent debt of over $10,000 a year.

Students Experiencing Homelessness Are Supposed to Get Extra Help. Here’s How California Can Do Better

Almost all children who experience housing insecurity also experience trauma because of the stress of their situation. California and the federal government recognize this, and require schools to provide these children with additional support.

But experts believe tens of thousands of California children experiencing homelessness fall through the cracks and receive little to no help from their schools.

Preparing for Wildfires With Evacuation Plans, Emergency Supplies – And Domestic Violence Awareness

As wildfires and other natural disasters increase due to our warming climate, so too do risks to domestic violence survivors and others vulnerable to abuse during times of disruption.

Because ​​about 1 in 4 women and nearly 1 in 10 men will experience physical or sexual violence or stalking by an intimate partner during their lifetime, disaster planning that doesn’t listen to the needs of domestic violence survivors can leave a vulnerable population to cope on their own.

As Wildfires Grow, So Does California’s Housing and Homelessness Crisis. Here Are Some Solutions

As climate change increases the intensity of wildfires in California, more people are losing their homes and facing long-term displacement and instability.

Researchers and those who work with disaster victims said there is insufficient government assistance to help the most vulnerable wildfire survivors find housing. There also isn’t enough housing to accommodate California’s swelling population of wildfire refugees.

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