LGBTQ Teens Face Increased Stress and Anxiety Under Trump

Since the presidential election in November, LGBTQ teens in a Concord-based group have voiced their anger and concerns about the Trump administration, and their fears that the president reverse progress on LGBTQ rights. The rise in stress among LGBTQ teens isn’t limited to the Bay Area. The Trevor Project, a nationwide crisis intervention and suicide prevention organization for LGBTQ youths, reports that call volume to its hotline doubled the day after the presidential election and has continued to increase.

California Considers Requiring Middle and High School to Start Later, In Effort to Give Teens More Sleep

Many California teens who come from low-income and immigrant families have a difficult time getting a full night’s rest because of their obligations outside school. A new bill headed to the California Assembly could allow these students and more than 2.7 million others statewide to get more rest every night by requiring all public middle and high schools in California to start no earlier than 8:30 a.m.

What Happens When ICE Detains Parents, From a Pediatrician’s Perspective

When I first met Daniel, he was 2 months old. His aunt, Sandra, brought him to the clinic in South Los Angeles where I work as a pediatrician because he had persistent coughing. While I was examining his lungs, he coughed so hard that he vomited in my hair. I was worried that he might have whooping cough and I started asking more about his history. First question: Why was he with his aunt and not his parents?

To Help Latinos Age Well, We Need to Address Inequities

Norma has been working since she was a teenager. She started working as a farmworker, then became a cannery worker and now works in childcare. Now at 60 years old, she is unsure if she “will ever be able to retire.” Her story is illustrative of the challenges that Latino seniors face trying to afford retirement, health care, food and housing.

What Data From California’s New Assisted Dying Law Tells Us

In the first six months of California’s new End of Life Option Act, which allows some terminally ill patients to end their lives with medication, there have been no initial surprises. California statistics are so far quite similar to those reported by Oregon and Washington, which also have aid-in-dying laws. However, many people seeking to use the End of Life Act are having trouble doing so.

Despite New Law, Doctor Directories Are Still Often Inaccurate

When Jackie called her assigned primary-care physician for the first time, she was told that her doctor was a specialist, not a primary care physician. She would need to see someone else, they informed her. Jackie then called her insurance company, and asked for help finding another doctor. Armed with a list from the insurance company, Jackie tried again, calling a doctor in the insurer’s directory. But, she recounted, “the receptionist said, ‘He’s not taking anybody and we’ve been trying to get off the list for three years.’”

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