Disparities

Black Men in White Coats, a New Video Project, Urges Young Black Men Toward Careers in Medicine

Rock star was never Olawale Amubieya’s career goal. Nevertheless, a recent video about him has gotten thousands of views in just a few weeks and fans are seeking him out. Amubieya, a fellow in the department of pulmonary and critical care medicine at the UCLA Medical Center, filmed the video about his work as a doctor for a video series called Black Men in White Coats. “The weight of being one of the few male black doctors in a medical center is tangible. Every new black male doctor gets closer to us changing the norm.”

Are We Asking the Wrong Question About Medi-Cal?

Health care advocates are always working on ways to make sure Medicaid is around to help people living in poverty. This is a good thing, but I also think it’s important to ask: Why do so many people require Medicaid? Why are so many people living and working in poverty? Why are we not working on more ways to lift people out of destitution?

In LA County, Mental Health Tax Money is Making a Difference

Los Angeles County, the most populous county in California, is successfully using money from a state tax on millionaires to fund programs that help the mentally ill, according to a new report. These efforts have succeeded in reducing homelessness, incarceration and hospitalization among the mentally ill, and improved the wellbeing of people served by the programs.

More Than A Decade Later, Recession-Era Cuts Still Hamper California’s Low-Income Residents

Beginning in 2008, as the nation was in the throes of the economic recession, California’s top leaders made a series of cuts to safety-net programs that sent many low-income residents in a downward spiral toward homelessness. While California’s economy has largely recovered since then, and the state’s food stamps and health programs have mostly been restored, the state’s welfare program has yet to see a reinvestment to pre-recession levels.

Doctor’s Notes: These Children Don’t Need to Die

Children living in high poverty neighborhoods—a disproportionate number of whom are children of color—are more likely to die from child abuse.

My patients in my clinic in South Los Angeles are children from high poverty areas. However, regardless of where they practice, pediatricians have a critical role in the recognition and prevention of child abuse.

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