Disparities

Pesticide Continues to Put Farmworkers and Fetuses in Harm’s Way

Maria Castro has worked in Kern County’s fields for 14 years, since her family moved to Delano from Mexico when she was 16 years old. She started working as a grape harvester two days after her arrival in the United States. She soon noticed a weird scent on her clothes that wouldn’t come off, even after washing.

What’s in Your Shopping Cart?

Having just bought a dozen or so quart-bottles of sports drinks – a riot of reds, yellows and blues wedged in the front of his shopping cart — Luis Gregorio Ruiz almost made it out of an Anaheim grocery store on a recent morning. But not quite. Maureen Villasenor, a physician in a white coat with a friendly manner, hustled over to Ruiz and introduced herself to him to chat about healthy drink choices.

GirlTrek Helps African-American Women Find Better Health

When Kendria McKnight of Elk Grove, Calif., first started walking for a minimum of 30 minutes a day, five days a week, she hoped to lower her blood pressure. She did that and much more. McKnight’s treks became part of a free national movement designed to improve the health of black women across the country one step at a time.

Farmworkers Fight For Overtime Pay and Better Working Conditions

The sun has just nosed above the horizon when Maria Espinosa (not her real name) ties a bandana over her face to protect herself from pesticides and dust, and reaches for a blackberry bush. Paid by the amount of berries she picks plus a $3-per-hour wage, Espinosa works feverishly for 10 hours, stopping only briefly for short breaks and lunch. For that day in early May, Espinosa would receive no overtime pay.

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