Children

Infant Mortality Rates Remain High in Some Counties

The infant mortality rate has consistently decreased in California in the last two decades, but a handful of counties in the state have rates that remain higher than average.

Mendocino and Fresno counties had infant mortality rates that were nearly twice the statewide average in 2013-15, the latest years for which data is available.

For Children With Autism, Zip Code Matters

Children of color who live in low-income neighborhoods are less likely to receive developmental services than white children with the same diagnosis living in a higher-income area, despite a law mandating state funding for comprehensive care for anyone who qualifies.

Specialized Preschools Help Toddlers Counter the Trauma of Homelessness

Children who have been homeless frequently have trouble falling asleep because they’ve moved around a lot, often sleeping in different beds each night and in environments they don’t feel safe in. This unpredictability affects them in other ways too: they may find it hard to trust adults, feel secure at school and manage emotions, and they are often developmentally behind other children of the same age.

Data Shows Historical Disparities in STD Rates

Since at least 2009, disparities have existed in rates of sexually transmitted diseases across the California.

African American young people ages 10 to 19 had the highest rates of chlamydia between 2009 and 2015, according to data from the California Department of Public Health posted by Kidsdata.

For Los Angeles Students who are Homeless, a School Provides Hope

In Los Angeles County, 63,000 students are considered homeless this year. Los Angeles Communities Advocating for Unity, Social Justice and Action YouthBuild, or LA CAUSA, is a project based learning school in East Los Angeles that provides a high school diploma program for “historically disenfranchised” Los Angeles residents ages 16-24. These are the stories of three formerly homeless students who are enrolled in the program.

Migrant Children Thwarted by the 50-Mile Rule

Since the 1970s, a state rule has required farmworkers to move at least 50 miles away from a migrant camp at the end of the season in order to continue to qualify for the housing. Now, advocates are trying to get California officials to change the 50-mile rule, which they say jeopardizes the educations of farmworker children, among other problems.

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